Physical Science Courses

  • PHYSICS                             (9625)                    Grades 11-12                       6 Credits

    Prerequisite:  

    • Successful completion of Chemistry Honors or Chemistry CP, and
    • Successful completion of an Algebra II course

    This course is designed for the inquisitive student who desires to know and understand the physical world in which he/she lives and desires to develop an ability to analyze critically and synthesize logically. The course of study is equally applicable to the scientist and humanitarian. Due to the nature of the material under study, course work includes laboratory investigations and problem solving. Topics include concepts of motion, mo­tion in the heavens, mechanics, light, electro­magnetism, models of the atom, and nuclear structure.


    PHYSICS HONORS                        (9626)                    Grade 11-12                        6 Credits (Honors)

    Prerequisite:

    • Minimum course grade of B- in Chemistry Honors, or
    • Minimum course grade of A- in Chemistry CP, and
    • Successful completion of an Algebra II course

    This is an accelerated full-year introductory physics program designed for the mathemati­cally and scientifically oriented student. A strong emphasis is placed on analytical thought and problem solving. Topics taught include: the nature and cause of motion, resolution and composition of forces, curvilin­ear and harmonic motion, conservation of energy and momentum, thermodynamics, dynamics, mechanical waves, geometric and physical optics, and electromagnetic theory. Attention will also be given to special relativ­ity, alternating current theory, and electronic devices.


    AP PHYSICS                      (9627)                    Grade 12                              10 Credits (AP)

    Prerequisite:

    • Minimum course grade of B- in Physics Honors, or
    • Minimum course grade of A- in Physics, and
    • Concurrently taking either AP Calculus or Calculus Honors

    The AP Physics course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or proceeded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating physical prin­ciples and in applying them to physical problems. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus. The course is the first part of a sequence which in college is sometimes a very intensive one-year course but which usually extends over one and one-half to two years.  COMPLETION OF A SUMMER ASSIGNMENT IS REQUIRED.